for Materialise

Multiplied QuaDror geometry forms a 3D-printed kinetic cube
 

In the midst of exploring potential applications for QuaDror, Belgian 3D printing innovator Materialise asked us to create a limited edition object for its design division, .MGX. I saw it as an opportunity to take the structural support system to a whole new level. One of 3D printing’s biggest advantages is its ability to create complex aggregations: shapes are effortlessly connected with incredible precision in ways that would be near impossible to achieve by hand.

Beyond QuaDror’s load-bearing ability, acoustic properties, and energy performance, we discovered that individual structures could be connected on all four sides and still maintain their collapsible shape. 3D printing was an ideal platform to experiment with QuaDror’s connectivity, as the computerized, complex parts could be easily multiplied and reconfigured.

Volume.MGX consists of one flat, laser-sintered 3D-printed piece created by 1,200 tiny QuaDror structures. In a single gesture, the table lamp stretches open to fit over a light bulb, which illuminates the fixture’s intricate shape. Light dances throughout the QuaDror geometry, resulting in a warm, subtle glow at the lamp’s center that fades as it reaches toward the edges.

Volume.MGX has been featured in exhibitions at the Museum of Arts and Design and the Contemporary Art Museum of Raleigh.

Date  2009


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Volume.MGX consists of one flat, laser-sintered 3D-printed piece
created by 1,200 tiny QuaDror structures
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